June 30, 2017 1 Comment

An objection is defined as an expression or feeling of disapproval or opposition; a reason for disagreeing. You need to be able to handle objections. Not everything a customer says to you is actually an objection—many times it’s just a complaint. “The price is too high” can be a complaint, which doesn’t mean that they aren’t a buyer. Always agree with them. If you don’t know what to expect you will get surprised and won’t be able to handle it. Don’t be caught off-guard. You need to learn everything you can about handling objections. Here are some tips:

1.Initiate Objections in the Greeting—I love to initiate the objection before the buyer can bring it up. To make this work you need to know every possible objection you will ever hear. If you know your buyer is going to have an objection, why would you wait for them to bring it up when you could bring it up? Why wait to be defensive? 99% of the time you will hear the same objections come up in your greeting, like “I’m just looking”. 

If I initiate, I can control. I want to initiate all of the things people are sensitive to—things like price, time, and pressure. If the customer already “knew” everything, they would have already bought. This is why you want to bring up objections before the customer is able to. Get them out of the way.

2.Handle Price in the Greeting—This is a misunderstood issue by salespeople. Price is not the problem. If you avoid price with your buyer, you will make them frustrated. The more you hide the price the more they will get angry. When a customer wants a price, agree and get it for them. Agreeing is the first rule of selling, so be happy to get them the price.

When you tell them you will get them the price, follow it with another question so you can transition.  When someone brings up the price and I agree with them that price is important and I can’t wait to get it for you, then transition into fact finding.  Never be scared of a price. People who ask for a price are buyers.

3.Don’t Disagree—Don’t try to be funny when talking about price. Don’t use any form of “no”, “not yet”, “can’t”, “I don’t know”, or “it depends”. Assure the customer you will take care of price without actually giving it prematurely. Price is not the reason people buy anything. You have to be confident with your price.

When it comes to the close your job is to justify the price, not reduce it. I have a product that is over twice the price of my competitors and I tell my customers it is the cheapest. I can say this because I know the value they will get from my product is ten times more—it’s a better deal.

4.Handle People That Want a Manager— I love it when people call in or walk in and want to speak with executives. I would rather waste time with a potential customer even if they have an issue than waste time by myself. “I want to speak to a manager” is an opportunity. There are 3 possibilities when someone asks for a manager: they are a vendor, they have a complaint, or they are a buyer. Vendors and complaints can be made into clients.

I once had an ad executive walk into a retail environment looking for the executives there to sell them advertising. An hour later I had sold him a house full of furniture before turning him over to my manager. He didn’t even make the sale to my manager. I took him out of his pitch and into mine.

Another time I had a guy come in with a big problem with the company—very heated. I resolved the issue by handling the return the same way management would have anyway, then sold the guy 10X the problem that he brought in with him to get rid of. He came in because the product didn’t satisfy him—because we had sold him too little product. I got him on more product and satisfied him.

Another time I had a professional buyer who was looking for the manager only because he thought it would save him time dealing with a manager and somehow save him some money on the purchase price by getting a deal. Not only did I sell him, but I gained access to his entire company’s account. So if someone says, “I want to see a manager” don’t pass on the opportunity. Go into every interaction with the intent to sell. So what can you say?

Customer:“I want to see a manager”

You:“Sir, thank you for coming in, I handle all the accounts for management here. My position was created to save you time, determine what you want, and introduce you to alternatives that will save you money. My job is to wait on you as management would if they could themselves. Would you allow me to do that for you? By the way, how do you know Mr. Johnson?”

Create an opportunity by solving a problem. Your management team hired you to deal with customers, not turn them over back to them. Always agree with your customers, handle price, and initiate objections in your greeting. Becoming a great salesperson takes skills, but first, it takes commitment.

If you would like to take your game to the next level, commit to your profession, and start making big money, come to my Sales Boot Camp.

Be great,

GC


1 Response

Jesse Belvin
Jesse Belvin

July 03, 2017

Loved the post brother!

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